About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16
raggedly for the "washington post" and our website is rachelscox.com. and this is her first book. "into dust and fire: five young americans who went first to fight the nazis." this is booktv on c-span2. >> with about one month left in 2012, many publications are putting out their year-end lists of notable books. booktv will feature several of these lists focusing on nonfiction selections. these nonfiction titles were included in the "washington post" best books of 2012. >> for a link visit booktv's website, booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> you may recognize garrett peck from a former bookie did on probation in washington, d.c. is back at local history with a new book on the potomac river, a history and guide. what does the potomac river start and end of? >> it is near davis west virginia, a tiny little trickle that comes out of the side of the mountain and then it ends at point a look at which is 11 miles wide. the river is pretty wide at the mouth in between there's a huge amount of history. hundreds of historic sites. this is where our nation grew up on. it al
washington to proclaim the protesters vandals. this about 50 # -- 50 # minutes. >> there is nothing so easy but to persuade people they are badly governed. those words were spoken by the brilliant 18th century massachusetts governor thomas hutchenson, and i'll tell you more about him later. let me tell you what else he said because the words hold true today as much as they did then in 1774. governor hutchenson said you can take the happiest and most comfortable people and use malicious, rhetorical skills to arouse popular discontent with their government, with their rulers, with everything around them, even themselves. this is one of the weaknesses, he said, these are his words "one of the weaknesses of human nature of which ambitious politicians make you to serve their purposes." i year before he uttered those words, a group of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single one of today's tea party patriots who knew what the origi
. it was a couple of days' ride from monticello to washington. he stopped at an inn and falls into a conversation with a fellow guest and they have a lovely, wide ranging discussion the next morning the other guest mr. jefferson is up and out and the other guest had never called his name and he said to the inn keeper who was that and he said who did you think it was? for a while and you knew so much about medicine i thought he was a doctor. then we talked about theology and he seemed as though he might be a priest though a shaky one. i thought he could have been certainly a farmer because of everything he knew and he said i thought you knew mr. jefferson. he was a master of so many different worlds and he was indefinitely curious at the time when human curiosity and the ability to lead us to our own destiny to fulfil in many ways our greatest potentials to discover, to explore was new in the world and this was the enlightened era. they had been a day before yesterday. for the first time ever, priestley and princely authority was in the dhaka, and jefferson was there to reap the harvest of the shi
on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the sixth president of the united states. he was a congressman as well for 16 years and a center for four years. most americans don't realize he was a congressman. many don't even know he was president. >> by your going to change that. >> yes. he was this enormously courageous congressman. the first congressman to stand up and call for emancipation before lincoln even knew how to spell the word. >> we will get back to emancipation and the abolition movement. someone said to me the other day i have read to biographies of joh
on washington, jefferson, madison and i had written on patrick henry, james monroe, john hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's pulitzer prize-winning book, profiles in courage and daring chapter one was john quincy adams. so i thought his name begins begins with a comma on the season chapter one. but i was not the reason. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of coverage and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american has terry. he was not just the sixth president of the united states. he was a congressman as well for 16 years and a senator for four. most americans don't realize he was a congressman. many don't even know he was president. >> well, you're going to change that. >> yes. he was this enormously courageous congressmen, the first congressman to stand up and call for emancipation before linking even knew how to spell the word. >> will get back to institution in a moment. a friend of mine who is a lawyer said to mean the other day, i read two biographies of john quincy adams. here's
't an impersonator, it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i and his two dogs have lunch together on monday since the dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session and they could of rome and play. was a weird sight, believe me. we were brought into the tiny little conference room, the two dogs, the senator and me with a card table in the middle, and the senator who was always on a diet. he would feel better the center he was head the biggest sand which i'd ever seen like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was and on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of bread and potato chips and we talked for three or four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i am a historian, and i went find stuff, and whenever i find i'm going to put in the book and who knows, by the time this book comes out there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's naim what the joseph p. ken
it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in session and they could roam and play in the senate. that's a weird site, believe me. we were brought into a tiny little conference room for two dogs, senator and me with the card table and the senator, who was always on the target. they believed he would feel better the center he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was end on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of red in potato chips. we talked for three, four hours. but i remember saying over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i'm an historian and i'm going to find stuff. whatever i find, i'm going to put the book. and who knows, but by the time this book comes out, there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's name would be joseph p. kennedy to th
it was not an impersonator, it was the senate asking me to come -- the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington, and the senator and i and his two dogs had lunch together. on mondays his dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session, and they could roam, yeah, play in the senate. it was a weird sight, believe me. [laughter] we were brought into a tiny little conference room. the two dog, the senator and me with a card table in the middle. and the senator, who was always on a diet, they believed that his back, he would feel better the thinner he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, you know, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was. and on a piece of bread. i add two pieces -- i had two pieces of bread and potato chips. [laughter] and we talked for three, four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book. because i'm a historian, and i'm going to find stuff. and whatever i find, i'm going put in the book. and who knows, but
speech, 30s congress convened in washington against tuesday or, abraham lincoln. abraham lincoln hurt clay speech amok and because he was visiting the town on its way from springfield to washington d.c., visiting mary family in lexington and while he was there can be cut to your henry clay's peak. this is a tremendous thing for lincoln. lincoln had idolized clay. he caught is though ideal of a politician and to have the opportunity to hear clay speak must've been a huge thing for him. when lincoln was young, he carried around a book of clay speeches in history than to himself. when he was a young man and the legislature in springfield community president of the clay club and asked him to speak in springfield and clay didn't comes, so this is lincoln's opportunity to to meet the politician he respects and admires the most to be hurt clay gives a speech against the war. so perhaps it isn't surprising that the blanket gets to washington instead of talking about terrorists or economic issues that motivated him as a politician come he decides to oppose the war. the first speech lincoln get
was african-american as well. i found belle's birth certificate, actually, in washington. she was born in washington, and it tells her birth date and lists 'c' for colored. and the family lived in washington for some years. greener was dean at the howard university law school. he was a very distinguished lawyer and scholar, an active republican. the republicans rewarded him for his service, recruiting blacks for the party, by making him the secretary of the grant monument in new--ulysses s. grant monument in new york, and he was appointed us consul in vladivostok by mckinley and roosevelt. but at some point, around that time, in the late 1890s, the family split up and they were--he was the darkest. the mother was very light-skinned and the children were very light-skinned. so they dropped the r off the end of their name and the mother said her name was genevieve i. greene, widow, although mr. greener was very much alive. and they brought--invented the name da costa, i think, to explain their exotic looks. and belle passed as white for the rest of her life, as far as i know. i don't thi
, this november, maryland, and washington in minnesota, and in maine, and they span the spectrum, and in two states, washington and maryland, the legislature passed gay marriage, now going to the voters to veto it or affirm the legislature's decision. in minnesota, they are voting on a marriage amendment saying marriage is one man and one woman, 30 some-odd states passed similar legislation, and in maine, for the figure time, trying to pass gay marriage. will be an interesting election for those of us who watch marriage, and, yet, you know, up until this year, gay marriage has never won any open vote. given this is a real question. given the simple and beautiful case you lay out for gay marriage, why do you think it has not -- why are there so many people who really are not on board with this gay marriage thing? >> guest: it's a fair question, but i don't like it when you call it the "gay marriage thing" because it sounds trendy. >> host: i thought you told us it was a trend. >> guest: i didn't mean it that way, but a trend of the -- i think people are afraid of the unknown. i think that, fr
irregulars in washington, which commemorates whitaker chambers and raises a lot of issues. some of you have been there, no. but you pick up all these little things about whitaker chambers, and there is one great story that i like to tell. when he had finished writing witness and he rode it out longhand, he wanted to have it published by the largest or one of the largest american publishers. as a fellow book publisher, he enjoyed the story. called and made a point. and they gave him his time. he came in and introduced in self to the woman sitting at the front desk and said that he was here. and so she called up to his office and she set, whitaker chambers is your. there was a pause. he said get the son of a bitch and a fair. and apparently surf had an intern who worked for him who have really never said anything before. he would help of his files and so on. he sort of stood up and said, mr. cirque, you're making a mistake. he said, whitaker chambers is an eminent man with a very powerful story to tell, and i suspect he has written a book that needs to be published, and you should see him. he
much the way george washington brushed aside his own impotence of ordnance in the revolution your while at key moments he put his foot down and essentially told the brits to stuff it. that didn't stop field marshal bernard montgomery from becoming a thorn in the sight of all american commanders in europe for the duration of the war. but ike, omar bradley, george patton all managed to work around to minimize the negative impacts of the war effort. so when the war ends we are expected to supply wealth and prosperity to all. we do to the death of our ability. and yet this brings with it this ironing that by supplying wealth and protection you are eroding the very disciplines that are necessary to maintain and perpetuate prosperity for yourself and prosperity and freedom for others. that would be the challenge for the next 75 years and the topic of volume two. how to provide a canopy of liberty and perpetuate american exceptionalism while allowing in just enough rain of difficulty and disappointment to remind americans and the world that the era in which we've all been blessed was no golden
's youngest writers. my undergraduate students for instance at george washington university. they are tremendously tech savvy. i have never seen one of them with a newspaper printed in his hand. and they have untrained and almost never use penmanship would've given him a heart attack. when the students who are very secure in their electronic and cyberworld dream of literary success, these creative writers i teach, they still tend to do it by summoning the very old imagine of trappings of print and paper and dust jackets. i find it when i talk to them is that they still want to write a book that someone will eventually put into their hands. even when they are queasy about exclusively electronic publications, especially online publications, which which can make a well-known writer feel like a blogger. anyone can do this feeling. but the web, especially where fiction is concerned is so not evolved from the so-called wild west days of the 1990s. precincts other, in which readers can find fiction that has been competitively selected and edited are there, but they remain comparati
of time life looks, writes regularly for "the washington post" and our web site is rachel cox.com -- >> rachel as cox. >> rachel s. cox.com, sorry about that, and this is her first book, "into dust and fire" five young americans who went to fight the nazi army. this is booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about a programming this weekend. you can tweet us of booktv. >> this is the cover of john goodman's newest book called "priceless" curing the health care crisis. booktv is some acacia net freedomfest in las vegas and dr. john goodman joins us now to talk about "priceless." dr. goodman lets start by asking you about the recent supreme court decision on the health care bill. what is your view of? >> i was sorry to see that decision. i wish the court had thrown out upon the care and we could start over and have a more rational health care reform. now we are going to have to deal with the law as it is and i think though even the supporters of the law are going to want to make major changes within and next year and to have. >> okay, let's start. what do you see as rationa
. everybody just -- the teachers including is a great one. the schools in washington, very successful about turning around inner city kids, and the kids in that school have to carry a book at all times. it's neat. funny you mention that. i did a reading at my home town, and my 2nd grade teacher was there. she's like 92 years old. i was signing books, and she said, james, your handwriting is still atrocious. [laughter] >> that's great. talk a little bit about where you see our culture going. you're doing -- >> oh, my god. >> i don't mean in general, but in terms of reading. are we creating a culture of readers, notary -- non-readers, where are we now? >> i think the worst thing that's happening is we're creating a culture where people don't listen. they don't listen to the other side. there's a quote -- i read an editorial in the "new york times" a couple weeks ago, and it had to do with morality's ability to behind -- bind and blind, and, you know, it binds people, you believe in, you know, you believe in whatever you believe in, abortion one way or the other or whatever you believe about e
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)